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Calendars

Our Content Management System (CMS) also supports a robust calendar system.  You can play with the demonstration below to get some idea of how this might work on your site.  You may add event categories including event categories as Google Calendar XML feeds. Each category may be represented by a color of your choosing.  

Got events? We can organize event information on your site in a powerful database system so that your visitors can see this information in the best possible way.  Sometimes just a chronological list is all you need. Other times you need a full calendar. We can display the information any way you want and even offer iCalendar subscriptions for Google Calendar, iCal and even Outlook.

Below is a sample calendar populated only with a couple of Google Calendar feeds to demonstrate how some of the calendar features work. The TGIF event demonstrates both a repeating event as well as the event detail dialog with a graphic.    

More Information = Click to view more details; Click on any day (not event) to view in Day mode
HERE 1

April Fools Day

Monday, April 01 2013

Location: Everywhere - BEWARE

Beware of pranxters. 


2

☾ Last Quarter Moon

Saturday, August 04 2018
04:18 AM PDT - 04:18 AM PDT

3

⚫ New Moon

Saturday, August 11 2018
07:58 PM PDT - 07:58 PM PDT

4

Perseids Meteor Shower

Sunday, August 12 2018
Should be AWESOME this year. The Perseids is one of the best meteor showers to observe, producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by comet Swift-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1862. The Perseids are famous for producing a large number of bright meteors. The shower runs annually from July 17 to August 24. It peaks this year on the night of August 12 and the morning of August 13. The thin crescent moon will set early in the evening leaving dark skies for what should be an excellent show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Perseus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

5

☽ First Quarter Moon

Saturday, August 18 2018
05:49 PM PDT - 05:49 PM PDT

6

Mercury Retrograde Ends

Sunday, August 19 2018
see http://cantonbecker.com/retrograde for details...

7

⚪ Full Moon

Sunday, August 26 2018
09:56 PM PDT - 09:56 PM PDT

8

☾ Last Quarter Moon

Sunday, September 02 2018
12:37 PM PDT - 12:37 PM PDT

9

Labor Day

Monday, September 03 2018

10

⚫ New Moon

Sunday, September 09 2018
04:01 AM PDT - 04:01 AM PDT

11

☽ First Quarter Moon

Sunday, September 16 2018
09:15 AM PDT - 09:15 AM PDT

12

Autumnal Equinox (Fall)

Saturday, September 22 2018
11:54 PM PDT - 12:54 AM PDT
The Sun will beam down directly on the equator giving us just about equal amounts of day and night in most parts of the world. If you live south of the equator, this is your Spring Equinox. Also, try balancing an egg on its end! Whether or not you succeed has nothing to do with the Equinox, but it's still a fun game to try any day of the year. :)

13

⚪ Full Moon

Monday, September 24 2018
12:53 PM PDT - 12:53 PM PDT

14

☾ Last Quarter Moon

Tuesday, October 02 2018
07:45 PM PDT - 07:45 PM PDT

15

Columbus Day (regional holiday)

Monday, October 08 2018

16

⚫ New Moon

Monday, October 08 2018
01:47 PM PDT - 01:47 PM PDT

17

Draconids Meteor Shower

Monday, October 08 2018
The radiant point for the Draconid meteor shower almost coincides with the head of the constellation Draco the Dragon in the northern sky. That’s why the Draconids are best viewed from the Northern Hemisphere. The Draconid shower is a real oddity, in that the radiant point stands highest in the sky as darkness falls. That means that, unlike many meteor showers, more Draconids are likely to fly in the evening hours than in the morning hours after midnight. This shower is usually a sleeper, producing only a handful of languid meteors per hour in most years. But watch out if the Dragon awakes! In rare instances, fiery Draco has been known to spew forth many hundreds of meteors in a single hour. The shower runs annually from October 6-10 and peaks this year on the the night of the 8th. This will be an excellent year to observe the Draconids because there will be no moonlight to spoil the show. Best viewing will be in the early evening from a dark location far away from city lights. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Draco, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

18

☽ First Quarter Moon

Tuesday, October 16 2018
04:02 AM PDT - 04:02 AM PDT

19

Orionids Meteor Shower

Sunday, October 21 2018
This shower runs annually from October 2 to November 7. It peaks this year on the night of October 21 and the morning of October 22. The Orionids are meteors left behind in the wake of Halley’s Comet. The nearly full moon will block some of the fainter meteors this year, but the Orionids tend to be fairly bright so it could still be a good show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Orion, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

20

⚪ Full Moon

Wednesday, October 24 2018
02:45 AM PDT - 02:45 AM PDT

21

Halloween

Wednesday, October 31 2018

22

☾ Last Quarter Moon

Wednesday, October 31 2018
02:40 AM PDT - 02:40 AM PDT

23

Daylight Saving Time ends

Sunday, November 04 2018

24

⚫ New Moon

Wednesday, November 07 2018
01:02 AM PDT - 01:02 AM PDT

25

Veterans Day

Sunday, November 11 2018

26

Veterans Day observed

Monday, November 12 2018

27

(Possible) Taurid Fireball Meteor Shower

Monday, November 12 2018
Keep your fingers crossed! Every now and then the Taurid meteor shower — normally modest — produces spectacular fireballs visible even in bright moonlight. Most recently this happened in 2008. Since the meteor stream is rather spread out in space, Earth takes several weeks to pass through it, causing an extended period of meteor activity, compared with the much smaller periods of activity in other showers. The Taurids are also made up of weightier material, pebbles instead of dust grains. The thin crescent moon will set early in the evening leaving dark skies for viewing. Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Taurus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

28

☽ First Quarter Moon

Thursday, November 15 2018
11:54 PM PDT - 11:54 PM PDT

29

Leonids Meteor Shower

Saturday, November 17 2018
The Leonids is an average shower, producing up to 15 meteors per hour at its peak. This shower is unique in that it has a cyclonic peak about every 33 years where hundreds of meteors per hour can be seen. That last of these occurred in 2001. The Leonids is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tempel-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1865. The shower runs annually from November 6-30. It peaks this year on the night of the 17th and morning of the 18th. The waxing gibbous moon will set shortly after midnight leaving fairly dark skies for what could be a good early morning show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Leo, but can appear anywhere in the sky

30

Mercury Retrograde Begins

Saturday, November 17 2018
see http://cantonbecker.com/retrograde for details...

31

Thanksgiving Day

Thursday, November 22 2018

32

⚪ Full Moon

Thursday, November 22 2018
02:39 PM PDT - 02:39 PM PDT

33

Black Friday

Friday, November 23 2018

34

☾ Last Quarter Moon

Thursday, November 29 2018
09:19 AM PDT - 09:19 AM PDT

35

⚫ New Moon

Thursday, December 06 2018
04:20 PM PDT - 04:20 PM PDT

36

Mercury Retrograde Ends

Thursday, December 06 2018
see http://cantonbecker.com/retrograde for details...

37

2019 Astro Calendar Updates Coming Soon!

Wednesday, December 12 2018
Hello, and HAPPY NEW YEAR! Canton (canton@gmail.com) will be adding additional 2019 calendar events (meteor showers, etc.) during the last week of 2018. Feel free to email him any suggestions. If you added this ICS calendar feed as a "subscription" instead of a one-time import, then new events should automatically flow into your calendar once they are made av ailable. Moon phases are already in place. Was this calendar helpful to you? Visit https://cantonbecker.com/astronomy-calendar/ to see how you can support this project for free.

38

Geminids "King" Meteor Shower

Thursday, December 13 2018
Planning on staying up late (or waking up early) for this one. The Geminids is the "king" of the meteor showers. It is considered by many to be the best shower in the heavens, producing up to 120 multicolored meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by debris left behind by an asteroid known as 3200 Phaethon, which was discovered in 1982. The shower runs annually from December 7-17. It peaks this year on the night of the 13th and morning of the 14th. The first quarter moon will set shortly after midnight leaving dark skies for what should be an excellent early morning show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Gemini, but can appear anywhere in the sky

39

☽ First Quarter Moon

Saturday, December 15 2018
08:49 PM PDT - 08:49 PM PDT

40

Winter Solstice

Friday, December 21 2018
07:23 AM PDT - 08:23 AM PDT
The winter solstice is the shortest day of the year, respectively, in the sense that the length of time elapsed between sunrise and sunset on this day is a minimum for the year. Of course, daylight saving time means that the first Sunday in April has 23 hours and the last Sunday in October has 25 hours, but these human meddlings with the calendar and do not correspond to the actual number of daylight hours. If you life in the southern hemisphere, this is your Summer Solstice, celebrating the longest day of the year. http://scienceworld.wolfram.com/astronomy/WinterSolstice.html

41

Ursids Meteor Shower

Friday, December 21 2018
The Ursids is a minor meteor shower producing about 5-10 meteors per hour. It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tuttle, which was first discovered in 1790. The shower runs annually from December 17-25. It peaks this year on the the night of the 21st and morning of the 22nd. This year the glare from the full moon will hide all but the brightest meteors. If you are extremely patient, you might still be able to catch a few good ones. Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Ursa Minor, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

42

⚪ Full Moon

Saturday, December 22 2018
02:49 AM PDT - 02:49 AM PDT

43

Christmas Eve

Monday, December 24 2018

44

Christmas Day

Tuesday, December 25 2018

45

☾ Last Quarter Moon

Saturday, December 29 2018
06:34 PM PDT - 06:34 PM PDT

46

New Year's Eve

Monday, December 31 2018

47

New Year's Day

Tuesday, January 01 2019

48

⚫ New Moon

Saturday, January 05 2019
10:28 AM PDT - 10:28 AM PDT

49

☽ First Quarter Moon

Sunday, January 13 2019
03:45 PM PDT - 03:45 PM PDT

50

⚪ Full Moon

Sunday, January 20 2019
02:16 PM PDT - 02:16 PM PDT

51

Total Lunar Eclipse

Sunday, January 20 2019
12:33 PM PDT - 03:51 PM PDT

52

Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Monday, January 21 2019

53

☾ Last Quarter Moon

Sunday, January 27 2019
06:10 AM PDT - 06:10 AM PDT

54

⚫ New Moon

Monday, February 04 2019
06:04 AM PDT - 06:04 AM PDT

55

☽ First Quarter Moon

Tuesday, February 12 2019
07:26 AM PDT - 07:26 AM PDT

56

Valentine's Day

Thursday, February 14 2019

57

Presidents' Day (regional holiday)

Monday, February 18 2019

58

⚪ Full Moon

Tuesday, February 19 2019
12:53 AM PDT - 12:53 AM PDT

59

☾ Last Quarter Moon

Tuesday, February 26 2019
08:28 PM PDT - 08:28 PM PDT

60

⚫ New Moon

Wednesday, March 06 2019
01:04 AM PDT - 01:04 AM PDT

61

Daylight Saving Time starts

Sunday, March 10 2019

62

☽ First Quarter Moon

Thursday, March 14 2019
08:27 PM PDT - 08:27 PM PDT

63

St. Patrick's Day

Sunday, March 17 2019

64

⚪ Full Moon

Wednesday, March 20 2019
11:43 AM PDT - 11:43 AM PDT

65

☾ Last Quarter Moon

Wednesday, March 27 2019
02:10 PM PDT - 02:10 PM PDT

Key:
Holidays
Phases